Introduction, Social Epistemology 30(3), James Collier

SERRC —  March 24, 2016 — Leave a comment

Editor’s Note:

    Taylor & Francis, the publisher of Social Epistemology, has kindly agreed to make the full text of the introduction to each issue freely available.

We continue to plumb the epistemological aspects of testimony while investigating assumptions regarding both the social nature of truth and of tacit knowledge. Yet, in this issue of Social Epistemology, we end our investigations with death. We reflect on what we can, and should, know about dead human bodies if we define them as waste. … please read the full text introduction …

Table of Contents for Social Epistemology 30(3)

❧ “There’s No (Testimonial) Justice: Why Pursuit of a Virtue is Not the Solution to Epistemic Injustice”, Benjamin R. Sherman
Last entry, to date, in the exchange on this article, on the SERRC.

❧ “The Generation of Knowledge from Multiple Testimonies”, Aviezer Tucker
Last entry, to date, in the exchange on this article, on the SERRC.

❧ “Two Sociologies of Science in Search of Truth: Bourdieu Versus Latour”, Elif Kale-Lostuvali
Last entry, to date, in the exchange on this article, on the SERRC.

❧ “Relating Polanyi’s Tacit Dimension to Social Epistemology: Three Recent Interpretations”, Walter Gulick
Last entry, to date, in the exchange on this article, on the SERRC.

❧ “Knowing ‘Necro-Waste’”, Philip R. Olson
Last entry, to date, in the exchange on this article, on the SERRC.

se_cover

No Comments

Be the first to start the conversation!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s