Archives For Abdelhaq M. Hamza

Author Information: Abdelhaq M. Hamza, University of New Brunswick, ahamza@unb.ca

Hamza, Abdelhaq M. “Whither Muslim Scholarship? A Reply to Jamal Mimouni Regarding Faith and Reason.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5, no. 3 (2016): 73-84.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2Nc

Please refer to:

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Image credit: -Reji, via flickr

I find it revealing that a Huxley from Arab lands drafted a response to my criticism of the creed (A’qida in Arabic) held by few of the Muslim protégés of the Templeton foundation and others. Indeed, the response came from someone who was not even mentioned in the brief article that appeared in the Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective (SERRC) almost two years ago in 2014. Moreover, the response that appeared on the 4th of March, 2016, on the SERRC website is not based on my original 2014 SERRC article contribution, but on a much longer version of the paper that I posted on my website Faith and Reason, and that the author fails to reference in his response for reasons that he alone may be able to explain; A similar article appeared on The Muslim500 of 2014-2015, and it is omitted, and it too does not appear in the footnotes and references of the reply. [1] It just reflects the type of scholarship adhered to and the lack of intellectual integrity.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Stefano Bigliardi, Tec de Monterrey, CSF, Mexico City and CMES, Lund University, stefano.bigliardi@cme.lu.se

Bigliardi, Stefano. “Reculer Pour Mieux Sauter! Replies to Howard and Hamza.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, no. 11 (2014): 30-34.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1Hs

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ledgeImage credit: Freaktography, via flickr

I conflate, in the same piece, my replies to Damian Howard’s and Abdelhaq M. Hamza’s recent contributions first and foremost for reasons of space. However, I think they have a feature in common: both, in their own way, seem to imply the necessity of a preliminary step. A step backwards, in order to proceed further with the discussion. Reculer pour mieux sauter goes a known French expression: to draw back in order to make a greater leap. Continue Reading…

Author Information: Abdelhaq M. Hamza, University of New Brunswick, ahamza@unb.ca

Hamza, Abdelhaq M. “Faith and Reason: The Re-Emergence of Neo-Mu’tazilite Thought in the Discourse of Modern Muslim Scientists.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, no. 10 (2014): 53-55.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1FM

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70589378_68a6939551_zImage credit: Ben Ostrowsky, via flickr

Abstracted from a paper submitted to Zygon, Journal of Science and Religion, September 2014.

Roger Penrose, in a series of three lectures delivered at Princeton University in October of 2003 under the title “Fashion, Faith and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe,” was very likely one of the first scientists to start describing the crisis modern physics has been going through.[1] Criticizing the string theory fashion, suggesting faith in quantum theory, and fantasizing about theoretical modeling, were the themes of Penrose’s lectures, which in many ways constitute the building blocks of a scientific creed; a creed that can no longer be held because the solutions proposed by this very science violate the very essence of this science. Continue Reading…