Archives For Curtis White

Author Information: Monique Dufour, Virginia Tech, msdufour@vt.edu; Gregory Sandstrom, European Humanities University, SERRC, gregory.sandstrom@ehu.lt; Adam Riggio, McMaster University, SERRC, adamriggio@gmail.com

Dufour, Monique, Gregory Sandstrom and Adam Riggio. “Beyond Polemic, Part, III.” Review of The Science Delusion, by Curtis White. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2, no. 12 (2013): 22-28.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-18o

Please refer to:

Circulating Scientism, Monique Dufour

The recent and much circulated Steven Pinker piece, “Science Is Not Your Enemy,” scolds recent critics of scientism, and extends “an impassioned plea to neglected novelists, embattled professors, and tenure-less historians.” What does he ask of this beleaguered group whom he deigns to address? Acknowledge that all great modern thinkers were actually scientists, and that scientism is little more than a “boo-word.” Accept that they need science and that science will enhance all of their endeavors, endeavors that would otherwise wallow in nostalgia, irrelevance, and resentment. And revel in the “gifts bestowed by science:” “the exhilarating achievement of scientific knowledge itself,” and “images of sublime beauty” that “science has provided the world.” Continue Reading…

Author Information: Gregory Sandstrom, European Humanities University, SERRC, gregory.sandstrom@ehu.lt; Adam Riggio, McMaster University, SERRC, adamriggio@gmail.com;Monique Dufour, Virginia Tech, msdufour@vt.edu

Sandstrom, Gregory, Adam Riggio and Monique Dufour. “Beyond Polemic, Part, II.” Review of The Science Delusion, by Curtis White. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2, no. 12 (2013): 14-21.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-17Y

Please refer to:

Beyond Polemic, Part II  

The Science Delusion: Asking the Big Questions in a Culture of Easy Answers
By Curtis White

Melville House Publishing, 224 pp., 2013

Can ‘Romanticised’ Humanities Help Overcome Natural Scientism Delusions? Gregory Sandstrom

Part I: The Reflexive Negative

“We Romantics, we Free Spirits (as Nietzsche liked to say), are in exile.” — White (197).

White’s The Science Delusion (TSD) is framed as a way of taking back the city of Knowledge in contemporary higher education and returning Romantic-Humanists or ‘Free Spirits’ from exile to positions of honour, dignity and worth. What jumps out in the book instead is an unnecessary inferiority complex demonstrated by a Professor of English when it comes to the hierarchy of disciplines in the contemporary academy.   Continue Reading…

Author Information: Adam Riggio, McMaster University, SERRC, adamriggio@gmail.com; Gregory Sandstrom, European Humanities University, SERRC, gregory.sandstrom@ehu.lt; Monique Dufour, Virginia Tech, msdufour@vt.edu

Riggio, Adam, Gregory Sandstrom and Monique Dufour. “Beyond Polemic, Part, I.” Review of The Science Delusion, by Curtis White. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2, no. 12 (2013): 7-11.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-17B

Please refer to:

The Science Delusion: Asking the Big Questions in a Culture of Easy Answers
By Curtis White

Melville House Publishing, 224 pp., 2013

Unreal Solutions to False Problems, Adam Riggio

Curtis White’s The Science Delusion (TSD) isn’t all that interesting in itself. What it means, however, is extremely interesting. TSD is a modern popular polemic, and as such drastically oversimplifies the philosophical ideas to which White refers. Someone with a reasonable university education in humanities, who is the book’s target demographic, will probably not learn much of anything from it that he or she didn’t already know.

But TSD can teach us a lot about how modern popular polemic books work and the problems of the discourse that such books shape. Continue Reading…