Archives For intellectuals

Author Information: Lyudmila A. Markova, Russian Academy of Sciences, Markova.lyudmila2013@yandex.ru

Markova, Lyudmila A. 2013. “New people and a new type of communication.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (11): 47-53.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-153

Please refer to:

  • Fuller, Steve. 2013. “What Does It Mean to be an Intellectual Today? An Interview with Steve Fuller by Filip Šimetin Šegvić.” Social Epismtemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (10): 12-17. 6 September. http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-Zf

Editor’s Note: Markova’s comment, posted originally on 7 October, accompanied Šegvić’s interview with Fuller. Subsequently, the comment was edited and posted here.

Steve Fuller considers the important topic of the origin of a new type of people. He calls them intellectuals, not wanting, apparently, to deviate too much from the terminology used to refer to people of intellectual labor. Fuller (2013, 12) gives the following definition:

An intellectual is someone who makes a living out of the production and distribution of ideas. The focus on ‘ideas’ is quite important because it means that the intellectual must be adept at communicating in a variety of media — e.g. not simply academic texts — through which ideas may be conveyed.

Intellectuals act as, what Fuller calls, ‘agents of distributive justice’. He means that if scientific knowledge is considered as free from any human characteristics, its distributive version “sets up the intellectual as an anti-academic figure who assumes that any complex conception worth conveying can be done effectively in the popular media” (12). Continue Reading…

Author Information: Filip Šimetin Šegvić, University of Zagreb, phillip.simetinsegvic@gmail.com

Fuller, Steve. 2013. “What Does It Mean to be an Intellectual Today? An Interview with Steve Fuller by Filip Šimetin Šegvić.” Social Epismtemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (10): 12-17. 6 September.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-Zf

An Interview with Steve Fuller by Filip Šimetin Šegvić, conducted by e-mail from Zadar, Croatia on 6 September 2013. The occasion for the interview was the annual conference, ‘Desnican Encounters’, dedicated to the 20th century Croatian writer and intellectual, Vladan Desnica. Fuller’s book The Intellectual has been translated to Croatian.

How would you define an intellectual and his or her role today? What should an intellectual represent in modern times?

An intellectual is someone who makes a living out of the production and distribution of ideas. The focus on ‘ideas’ is quite important because it means that the intellectual must be adept at communicating in a variety of media — e.g. not simply academic texts — through which ideas may be conveyed. Intellectuals have been effective in two roles in the modern period: First, they develop society’s immune system by challenging taken-for-granted notions so that even if society fails to fully adopt an intellectual’s provocation, it comes away both with a stronger sense of its own identity and greater open-mindedness to the wider world. Second, they act as what I have called ‘agents of distributive justice’, in that they often magnify the voice of those minorities or dissenters who might not otherwise receive a fair hearing in society. Continue Reading…