Archives For Justin O. Parkhurst

Author Information: Srinivasa Vittal Katikireddi, University of Glasgow, vittal.katikireddi@glasgow.ac.uk

Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal. “Reply to ‘What Constitutes “Good” Evidence for Public Health and Social Policy Making? From Hierarchies to Appropriateness’.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 8 (2015): 51-55.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2eE

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public_health

Image credit: kafka4prez, via flickr

The academic community has long considered how knowledge can and should influence decision-making. The evidence-based medicine movement rose to prominence in the 1990s, with its influence extending from clinical decisions to areas of social policy. Parkhurst and Abeysinghe provide a useful addition to the literature which ambitiously draws on three different disciplinary perspectives—political science, philosophy of science and the sociology of knowledge—to reflect on the limitations of evidence hierarchies for informing policy decisions (2014). Public health is perhaps a natural focus of enquiry, drawing as it does on clinical disciplines as well as the social and political sciences.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Justin O. Parkhurst, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, justin.parkhurst@lshtm.ac.uk ; Sudeepa Abeysinghe, University of Edinburgh, Sudeepa.Abeysinge@ed.ac.uk

Parkhurst, Justin O and Sudeepa Abeysinghe. “What Constitutes ‘Good’ Evidence for Public Health and Social Policy Making? From Hierarchies to Appropriateness.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, no 10 (2014): 40-52.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1E3

Abstract

Within public health, and increasingly other areas of social policy, there are widespread calls to increase or improve the use of evidence for policy making. Often these calls rest on an assumption that increased evidence utilisation will be a more efficient or effective means of achieving social goals. Yet a clear elucidation of what can be considered ‘good evidence’ for policy is rarely articulated. Many of the current discussions of best practice in the health policy sector derive from the evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement, embracing the ‘hierarchy of evidence’ that places experimental trials as preeminent in terms of methodological quality. However, a number of problems arise if these hierarchies are used to rank or prioritise policy relevance. Continue Reading…