Archives For Tommaso Castellani

Author Information: Tommaso Castellani, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, t.castellani@irpps.cnr.it; Emanuele Pontecorvo, Sapienza University of Rome; Adriana Valente, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, National Research Council of Italy, adriana.valente@cnr.it

Castellani, Tommaso, Emanuele Pontecorvo and Adriana Valente. “Epistemic Consequences of Bibliometric Evaluation: A Reply to Rip and Stöckelová.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 4 (2015): 29-33.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1YR

Please refer to:

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Image credit: Jedediah Laub-Klein, via flickr

In writing a contribution on the consequences of bibliometric evaluation on the practices of doing science, we were aware of dealing with a very delicate matter, which may be easily subject to objections and misunderstandings.

We are grateful to Arie Rip and Tereza Stöckelová for having carefully read and commented our paper, helping us to identify in which directions our arguments can be reinforced and, not least, giving us the opportunity to further reflect on our work. Starting from their comments, we are going to further clarify and expand our reasoning. Namely, we are going to address three main issues:

1. The methodology of the work, in relation to its objectives;
2. The logical sequence of our reasoning;
3. The conclusions of the study.

We will develop these points in the following three sections.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Tereza Stöckelová, Institute of Sociology, Czech Academy of Sciences, tereza.stockelova@soc.cas.cz

Stöckelová, Tereza. “Unspoken Complicity: Further Comments on Castellani, Pontecorvo and Valente and Rip.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 2 (2015): 17-20.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1TK

Please refer to:

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As academia changes, it is vitally important to reflect on and study these changes empirically. However, while bibliometrics, research assessment exercises and modes of publishing, more generally, constitutes a major aspect of these changes—and many of the unsettling insights offered by the paper under discussion resonate with my own research— the tendencies, as I will argue, are more differentiated, varied and ambiguous than what might be concluded from Castellani, Pontecorvo and Valente’s paper (2014). In my commentary, I will further develop selected points made by Rip (2014). These points will concern methodology, the active role of scientists in the proliferation of measurements in contemporary research systems and the situated nature of practices of valuing academic performance. I will draw upon my, and my colleagues’, research in the Czech Republic (Linková, Stöckelová 2012; Stöckelová 2012, 2014; Felt, Stöckelová 2009; Dvořáčková et al. 2014) where—similarly to Italy—bibliometrics and quantitative research evaluation have started recently to play a major role.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Arie Rip, University of Twente, a.rip@utwente.nl

Rip, Arie. “On Epistemic Effects: A Reply to Castellani, Pontecorvo and Valente.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no.1 (2014): 47-51.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1Qo

Please refer to:

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Image credit: Elliott Brown, via flickr

It is important to critically consider ongoing changes in scientific practices and institutions, and do that on the basis of relevant data of sufficient scope and depth. Thus Castellani, Pontecorvo and Valente’s piece on epistemological consequences of bibliometrics is to be welcomed. However, I will also be critical in my commentary, in the spirit of organized scepticism. Doing so forced me to think through some of these issues again. After such an Auseinandersetzung (as the Germans can phrase it), we all will at least be able to articulate the issues better.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Tommaso Castellani, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, t.castellani@irpps.cnr.it ; Emanuele Pontecorvo, Physics Department, Sapienza University of Rome; Adriana Valente, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies, National Research Council of Italy, adriana.valente@cnr.it

Castellani, Tommaso, Emanuele Pontecorvo and Adriana Valente. “Epistemological Consequences of Bibliometrics: Insights from the Scientific Community.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, no. 11 (2014): 1-20.

This research has been supported by the ScienceOnTheNet project of the Italian Ministry for Education, University and Research.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1GH

2890933648_8e232deaa9_z Image Credit: SamahR, via flickr

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to investigate the consequences of the bibliometrics-based system of evaluation of scientific production on the contents and methods of sciences. The research has been conducted by means of in-depth interviews to a multi-disciplinary panel of Italian researchers. We discuss the implications of bibliometrics on the choice of the research topic, on the experimental practices, on the publication habits. We observe that the validation of the bibliometric practices relies on the acceptance and diffusion within the scientific community, and that these practices are self-sustained through their wide application. We discuss possible evolving scenarios, also considering the recent development of digital archives.

Continue Reading…