Archives For Islam and Science

Author Information: Abdelhaq M. Hamza, University of New Brunswick, ahamza@unb.ca

Hamza, Abdelhaq M. “Whither Muslim Scholarship? A Reply to Jamal Mimouni Regarding Faith and Reason.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5, no. 3 (2016): 73-84.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2Nc

Please refer to:

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Image credit: -Reji, via flickr

I find it revealing that a Huxley from Arab lands drafted a response to my criticism of the creed (A’qida in Arabic) held by few of the Muslim protégés of the Templeton foundation and others. Indeed, the response came from someone who was not even mentioned in the brief article that appeared in the Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective (SERRC) almost two years ago in 2014. Moreover, the response that appeared on the 4th of March, 2016, on the SERRC website is not based on my original 2014 SERRC article contribution, but on a much longer version of the paper that I posted on my website Faith and Reason, and that the author fails to reference in his response for reasons that he alone may be able to explain; A similar article appeared on The Muslim500 of 2014-2015, and it is omitted, and it too does not appear in the footnotes and references of the reply. [1] It just reflects the type of scholarship adhered to and the lack of intellectual integrity.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Gereon Wolters, University of Konstanz, gereon.wolters@uni-konstanz.de

Editor’s Note:

    Through Stefano Bigliardi, Professor Wolters provided the SERRC with an extended abstract of a paper to be published in Bollettino della Società Filosofica Italiana. Wolters’ abstract, and future article, fits into the larger discussion on Islam and science being hosted by the SERRC.[a]

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2oC

From everyday life we know that quite a few people insist on having the last word on whatever issue. This seems to be connected with exerting power on others. How about the last word in cognitive contexts, particularly in religion (as far as it is cognitive) and science, humanities and social sciences included? Is not defending truth here the motive for the last word? My thesis is that also in these cognitive contexts rather power than truth, or better authority connected with power is the central issue. Only enlightened rational thinking that found its most vocal and popular expression in Karl Popper’s Logic of Scientific Discovery (original in German, 1935) came to the conclusion that there is no last word, neither in science nor in other cognitive fields. One should fight—this is the normative part of the paper—both the ongoing claims to the last word in cognitive matters by religious fundamentalists and “postmodern” Western relativism. The latter correctly joins modern philosophy of science in rejecting the last word, denies, however, that there are objective second last words, based on universalizable arguments and evidence.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: M. Zaki Kirmani, Centre for Studies on Science, Aligarh, India, kirmanimz@gmail.com

Kirmani, M. Zaki. “The Aligarh School of Islam and Science Studies: Understanding its Background and Distinctive Features.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 10 (2015): 33-46.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2oF

Editor’s Note:

    Please find below the footnotes articles in the exchange on Islam and science appearing on the SERRC. [a] The SEEC thanks Liesl Drew for her editorial assistance with this article.

Image credit: Yasmeen, via flickr

Abstract

With the intent of providing an introduction of the Aligarh School and its basic approach to Islam and Science studies, this article introduces the intellectual currents that influenced its outlook, its approach and view points with regard to Islam’s response to science and the issues it raises. It explores its distinctive features and factors that have shaped its identity.  Continue Reading…

Author Information:Josep Lluís Mateo Dieste, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, joseplluis.mateo@uab.cat

Mateo Dieste, Josep Lluís. “Anthropocentrism and Divine Objectivity. Some Observations on the Logic Behind the ‘Scientific Miracle of the Qur’an’.” [1]Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 10 (2015): 8-9.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2ly

Editor’s Note:

    Please find below the footnotes articles in the exchange on Islam and science appearing on the SERRC. [a]

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Image credit: Michael Foley, via flickr

The “scientific miracle of the Qur’an” acquired its present-day form and gained momentum after Maurice Bucaille’s success in 1976, when authors like the Yemenite Zindani or Khalifa set out for ambitious goals such as the scientific demonstration of Qur’anic “miracles.” [2] In the context of the Seventh Saudi Medical Conference (1982) Zindani set up a committee to investigate the scientific signs in the Qur’an and the Hadith. Since then world congresses and local ones have been frequent, including the publication of books and materials that new information technology decisively helped to spread.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Tauseef Ahmad Parray [1], Aligarh Muslim University, tauseef.parray21@gmail.com

Parray, Tauseef Ahmad. “Sir Sayyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898) on Taqlid, Ijtihad, and Science-Religion Compatibility.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 6 (2015): 19-34.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-286

Editor’s Note:

    Please find below the footnotes articles in the exchange on Islam and science appearing on the SERRC. [a]

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Image credit: Wikipedia Commons

Contextualizing the Discourse

‘Modernism’—a movement to reconcile Islamic faith with modern values such as democracy, rights, nationalism, rationality, science, equality, and progress—emerged in the middle of the 19th century as a response to European colonialism, which pitched the Muslim world into crisis. Islamic modernism generated a series of novel institutions, including schools that combined Islamic education with modern subjects and pedagogies; newspapers that carried modernist Islamic ideas across continents; constitutions that sought to limit state power; and social welfare agencies that brought state power into even more sectors of social life. Thus, Islamic modernism began as a response of Muslim intellectuals to European modernity, who argued that Islam, science and progress, revelation and reason, were indeed compatible. They did not simply wish to restore the beliefs and practices of the past; rather they asserted the need to ‘reinterpret and reapply’ the principles and ideals of Islam to formulate new responses to the political, scientific, and cultural challenges of the west and of modern life.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Rana Dajani, Hashemite University, rdajani@hu.edu.jo

Dajani, Rana. “A Response to Damian Howard.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 3 (2015): 43-44.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1WC

Please refer to:

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Image credit: LWYang, via flickr

In response to Damian Howard’s reflections (“Some Reflections on Stefano Bigliardi’s ‘On Harmonizing Islam and Science’”, 2014) on Stefano Bigliardi’s piece, I have two points to make.

1. I quote Howard:

If, as Bigliardi suggests, they are favourable to the idea of biological evolution (which, I think we have to admit is not present as an idea in either the Qur’an or the Bible) can that in any way enhance their religious outlook, beliefs and practices? And if not, why not?

I disagree on two counts.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Stefano Bigliardi, Tec de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Mexico City; CMES, Lund University, stefano.bigliardi@cme.lu.se

Bigliardi, Stefano. “Some Observations on Isra Yazicioglu’s Understanding the Qur’anic Miracle Stories in the Modern Age.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 2 (2015): 13-16.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1Tw

Please refer to:

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Image credit: ccarlstead, via flickr

In the conclusive sections of his monograph Islam’s Quantum Question (2011), which stands out in the contemporary debate over Islam and science not only by virtue of the original, specific viewpoints expressed but also for its capacity to depict in detail the landscape of that very debate, Nidhal Guessoum rightly focuses on the issue of miracles as one that proves crucial in the discussion over the harmony of Islam and science as well as, more generally, at the interface of science and religion. [1]  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Stefano Bigliardi, Tecnológico de Monterrey, CSF, Mexico City; Center for Middle Eastern Studies, CMES, Lund University, stefano.bigliardi@cme.lu.se

Bigliardi, Stefano. “What We Talk About When We Talk About Iʿjāz.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4, no. 1 (2014): 38-45.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1PI

Please refer to:

8423042510_3da57a1c35_kImage credit: Sean Molin, via flickr

Recent conversations with Salman Hameed and Vika Gardner at the Center for the Study of Science in Muslim Societies (SSiMS, Hampshire College, Amherst, MA) about their ongoing project made me aware once again of the volume of iʿjāz-related material in the contemporary discourse over Islam and science, especially represented by videos uploaded on YouTube and other websites.

Classically, the term iʿjāz indicates the “invalidation of a challenge,” the impossibility of imitating the Qur’ān as to its content and form. In other words the term refers to the theological doctrine according to which a sign of the divinity of the Qur’ān is its incomparability or impossibility to be replicated; the like of the Qur’ān could not be produced even in a joint effort by human beings and supernatural ones.

Continue Reading…

Author Information: Majid Daneshgar, University of Otago, New Zealand majid.daneshgar@otago.ac.nz

Daneshgar, Majid. “Tantāwī: Western -Eastern Discoveries Embedded in Islam.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, no.12 (2014): 113-115.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1NQ

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Image credit: Christopher Rose, via flickr

Please refer to:

This essay may take its place alongside S. Kamal Abdali’s statement that since the 1930s, Islam became a ‘system of life’ and it covers all aspects of human life.[1] This point that modern science helped Muslims to fully understand Islam as a system of life or as the origin of all Western-Eastern discoveries is still under consideration. On this subject, it would be interesting to know further about Tantāwī Jawharī (1862-1940); an Egyptian sheikh who opined that Islam covers all scientific findings in the Orient and Occident.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Mehdi Golshani, Sharif University of Technology, mehdigolshani@yahoo.com

Golshani, Mehdi. “Some Clarifications Concerning My Views about Science and Religion.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, no. 12 (2014): 90-91.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1MR

Please refer to:

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Image credit: European Southern Observatory, via flickr

In his criticism of Stefano Bigliardi’s recent monograph, Islam and the Quest for Modern Science, Ebrahim Azadegan offered two points, in relation to Bigliardi, characterizing my views on the relationship of science and religion:

(1) That Bigliardi does not consider me an advocate of “Islamization” of science;

(2) That Bigliardi considers me only as a believer in the harmony of Islam with science, or a believer in Islam being on equal footing with other monotheistic religions.

Here are my comments about these points:  Continue Reading…