Archives For Robert Lockie

Author Information: Nikolaj Nottelmann, University of Southern Denmark, nottelmann@sdu.dk 

Nottelmann, Nikolaj. “Epistemic Poverty, Subjectivism, and the Concept of Epistemic Justification: An Additional Reply to Lockie.” [1] Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5, no. 5 (2016): 7-15.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2VL

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30 Cheval, Sun Valley Idaho

Image credit: Thomas Hawk, via flickr

Abstract

In this response to Robert Lockie’s recent SERRC entry “Response to Elqayam, Nottelmann, Peels and Vahid on my paper ‘Epistemic Poverty, Internalism, and Justified Belief’” I argue that his rejoinders to my previous debate contribution “Epistemic Poverty, Internalism, and Justified Belief: A Response to Robert Lockie” misrepresent two important aspects of my argument. First, I did not disrespect Lockie’s empirical sources. Second, and most importantly, I did not endorse or hypostasize a reliabilist conception of epistemic justification. Thus, Lockie’s central counter-arguments do not undermine my original set of objections. However, in his reply Lockie offers substantial self-termed “glimpses” into his “larger epistemological project” and into his preferred stripe of “deontic internalism”. Those glimpses seem to provide some material for a more nuanced engagement with the so-called poverty objection, even if I argue that an important version of that objection remains in force.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Robert Lockie, University of West London, bob.lockie@uwl.ac.uk

Lockie, Robert. “Response to Elqayam, Nottelmann, Peels and Vahid on My Paper ‘Perspectivism, Deontologism and Epistemic Poverty’.” [1] Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5, no. 3 (2016): 21-47.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2Jh

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light_doves

Image credit: Christian, via flickr

Abstract

I here respond to four SERRC commentators on my paper ‘Perspectivism, Deontologism and Epistemic Poverty’: Shira Elqayam, Nikolaj Nottelmann, Rik Peels and Hamid Vahid. I maintain that all accounts of epistemic justification must be constrained by two limit positions which have to be avoided. One is Conceptual Limit Panglossianism (an excessively subjective, ‘emic’, ‘bounded’ and ‘grounded’, relativistic perspectivism, whereby anything the epistemic agent takes to be justified, is). The other is Conceptual Limit Meliorism (an excessively objective, ‘etic’, ‘unbounded’, ‘ungrounded’, absolutism, whereby the fundamental normative-epistemic notion of justification is wholly divorced from regulative, human, capacities). Within these bounds one may offer an account of rationality or epistemic justification that is closer to Meliorism or Panglossianism. Remarked upon are my respondents’ considerations on Alston, on suggestions for a separation between a more-subjective epistemic justification and a more-objective rationality, and objections to my position based on the assumption that we must embrace a very objective and truth-conducive concept of epistemic justification.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Hamid Vahid, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, Tehran, vahid@ipm.ir

Vahid, Hamid. “Deontological Perspectivism: A Reply to Lockie.” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5, no. 2 (2016): 12-17.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2Bi

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perspective

Image credit: Indigo Skies Photography, via flickr

Abstract

In his (2015) paper, Robert Lockie seeks to add a contextualized, relativist dimension to rationality by targeting Alston’s epistemic poverty objection to the deontological conception of epistemic justification. I shall argue that Lockie’s presentation of the dialectic of Alston’s argument is flawed and that his appeal to a subjective notion of justification cannot answer Alston’s challenge unless he is able to show that such a notion best represents our epistemic practices.  Continue Reading…

Author Information: Nikolaj Nottelmann, University of Southern Denmark, nottelmann@sdu.dk

Nottelmann, Nikolaj . “Epistemic Poverty, Internalism, and Justified Belief: A Response to Robert Lockie.”[1] Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5, no. 1 (2016): 12-28.

The PDF of the article gives specific page numbers. Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-2y8

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perspectivism

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Abstract

In his recent Social Epistemology article “Perspectivism, Deontologism and Epistemic Poverty” Robert Lockie aims to disarm the so-called “epistemic poverty objection” to the deontological conception of epistemic justification (DCEJ). I first offer a regimentation of that objection, inspired by Laurence BonJour. I then turn to examining Lockie’s counter-arguments. As it turns out, rather than addressing directly conceptual issues within epistemology, Lockie’s main efforts go into arguing that generally epistemic subjects from outside contemporary advanced communities are not as poverty-stricken, as some modern epistemologists may have thought. I review Lockie’s arguments to that conclusion as well as alternative ways of arguing for a similar point, and conclude that they do not decisively undermine the poverty objection. I then turn to Lockie’s argument that a suitable version of epistemic access-internalism may successfully counter the poverty objection. I here conclude that the version of access-internalism Lockie needs is non-standard as well as implausible. The upshot is that even if Lockie’s article has brought several interesting and original concerns to bear on the debate over DCEJ, he has not defeated the poverty objection.  Continue Reading…